The official bulletin of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 1982-present.

Art Documentation is the official bulletin of the Art Libraries Society of North America, 1982-present. It includes articles and information relevant to art librarianship and visual resources curatorship. Since 1996, it has been published twice yearly (spring and fall). The subscription to Art Documentation is included as part of membership in ARLIS/NA. Authors who wish to publish their work in Art Documentation should consult the Contributor Guidelines.

Art Documentation is published for ARLIS/NA by University of Chicago Press, which supports green open access for all of its journals. Authors may self-archive their own articles and make them freely available through institutional repositories after a one-year embargo. Authors may also post their articles in their published form on their personal or departmental web pages or personal social media pages, use the article in teaching or research presentations, provide single copies in print or electronic form to their colleagues, or republish the article in a subsequent work, subject to giving proper credit to the original publication of the article in Art Documentation, including reproducing the exact copyright notice as it appears in the journal.

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Tables of Contents

To search Art Documentation contents 1982-present, go to the journal home page.

2019: Volume 38

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2018: Volume 37

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2017: Volume 36

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2016: Volume 35

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2015: Volume 34

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2014: Volume 33

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2013: Volume 32

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2012: Volume 31

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2011: Volume 30

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2010: Volume 29

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2009: Volume 28

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

2008: Volume 27

Issue 1 / Spring
Issue 2 / Fall

 

Current Issue Abstracts

Art Documentation vol. 38, no. 1 (Spring 2019)

The Outcome of the ArtFrame Project: A Domain-Specific BIBFRAME Exploration
Elizabeth O’Keefe, Melanie Wacker, and Marie-Chantal L’Ecuyer-Coelho

Abstract—The ArtFrame Project, a part of the Linked Data for Production (LD4P) collaboration, was a domain-specific, linked-open-data (LOD) initiative that explored the metadata practices of art libraries and museums. The project, headed by Columbia University Libraries and including major art institutions and the Cataloging Advisory Committee (CAC) of the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA), focused on developing an extension to the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME) tailored to the needs of art catalogers.  This article describes the history of the project and its collaboration with the LD4P Rare Materials Extension Group to produce a shared ontology, the Art & Rare Materials BIBFRAME Ontology Extension (ARM). 

The Possibilities of Constructing Linked Data for Art Exhibition Histories
Karly Wildenhaus

Abstract—Valuable information can be found in relationships between objects, even while libraries and archives traditionally have prioritized the description of and access to discrete objects. Referencing curatorial studies and their emphasis on the study of exhibitions, the author explores how linked data could be used to represent art exhibition histories meaningfully. This would not only address a research need in art scholarship by helping to make archival materials and lesser-known art histories more accessible, but it could also contribute to a better understanding of how exhibition practices and the art historical canon have been shaped across institutions and geographies. Although the idea is presented here in its early stages, the author references recent efforts that could serve as starting points—such as those by the Museum of Modern Art and the American Art Collaborative’s Linked Art initiative—and considers potential challenges and next steps.

Mapping Art History: Enhancing the Teaching of German Art History with Student-Created Maps
Brett M. Van Hoesen, Laura Rocke, and Ann Medaille

Abstract—While art history students frequently are required to write research papers, they often have trouble understanding some of the more abstract constructs they encounter. They may struggle to grasp the role that research plays in probing questions about the relationships between people, places, and events that compose complex historical periods. This article describes a collaboration between an art history professor, a librarian, and a digital humanities specialist in which students were taught how to conduct research for an art history course on German art 1900-present and then visualize that research through story maps created with ArcGiS. Through these mapping projects, students were encouraged to engage with the history of German art on a physical level, to map spatial relationships between social networks, artists’ studios, exhibition venues, art museums, architecture, and other important historical sites that were integral to the development of major art movements. This case study article outlines the project, including its learning outcomes, pedagogical strategies, student products, and assessment data. In addition, it describes how the project developed through different iterations. Ultimately, this collaborative, interdisciplinary project may provide a model for ways that visualization in general and map creation in particular can be used as a teaching strategy to make art history come alive for students by opening new conceptual territory, prompting intriguing questions, generating unique answers, and engaging art history in a more physical, spatial manner. 

Copyright Assessment in the Trenches: Workflow, Tools, Metadata, and More
Megan De Armond, Greg Cram, Rina Elster Pantalony, and Victoria Pilato

Abstract—Assessing copyright varies from institution to institution along with the specific workflow and end-user notices. This article looks at tools used in art libraries in a range of contexts along with pragmatic perspectives on copyright evaluation from a museum art library, a public research library, a university copyright advisory office, and a public university. Pain points for determining copyright presented by various formats, ownership issues, and digitization are addressed through cases encountered by the authors. Helpful tools and workflow strategies for moving forward, including widely available charts and resources, as well as software for copyright determination, are shared. Finally,the authors describe how different institutions are handling rights metadata.

Art, Rights, and Repositories: Contextualizing Information Literacy with the Institutional Repository
Larissa Garcia

Abstract—Although the open access movement and institutional repositories (IRs) have become increasingly popular among faculty, those in the creative arts, where artistic output is not always connected to traditional notions of scholarship, have been slower to make use of IRs. This article describes a pilot project to deposit undergraduate Bachelor of Fine Arts students’ senior project “media packets” into a university’s IR as part of the information literacy curriculum.  The initiative introduced students to the concepts of copyright and access as they related to their own work.

The William Randolph Hearst Archive at Long Island University: A Resource for Provenance Research
Catherine Larkin

Abstract—Questions concerning the provenance of art objects recorded in the William Randolph Hearst Archive originate from museums, private collections, academic institutions, and auction houses.1Recently, two aspects of inquiry have taken on international focus. First, the “new nationalists movement” in the United Kingdom,2concerned with the repatriation of architectural salvages from structures such as Gwydir Castle in Wales and Hamilton Palace in Scotland, has spurred new investigations.3Second, in the midst of a digital project to provide electronic access to Hearst’s archival records through the Artstor Digital Library, a number of objects acquired by Hearst from forced sales during the Nazi Era (1933-1945) have been discovered. The author discusses works from the collections of Rosa and Jacob Oppenheimer, Frau Margarete Oppenheim, and Ottmar Strauss.4

Aspiring to Greatness with Hindsight and Foresight: Assessing Current Preservation and Conservation Practices of Art Museum Library Collections
Beth Morris

Abstract—Art museum library collections are unique in scope and invaluable as a principal institutional asset; therefore, extensive preservation and conservation activities for these collections can be justified.  By conducting a survey and literature review, the author examines and explores current preservation and conservation activities for art museum library collections: how these actions are realized, staff structures required, the historical contexts of preservation, and how decision-making affects collections and value.  She also clarifies the necessity for funding and collaboration to achieve higher standards of integrated preservation for art museum library collections in all formats.

Proactive Collection Care: Leveraging Use Data in a Non-Circulating Art Library
Laura McCann and Michael P. Hughes

Abstract—Art libraries face unique challenges with collection care of their print monographs. In addition to being large, heavy, and densely illustrated, art monographs are at risk for accelerated wear and tear through routine use because of the construction and materials. At the same time, libraries everywhere face budget constraints along with increased demands on financial and human resources. This article describes the steps taken to design and implement a low-cost proactive collection care program in a non-circulating art library. High-use areas in the stacks were selected through analysis of use data and surveys of selected subject areas to determine condition and risk of damage. Finding that the high-use areas have a higher percentage of at-risk books, the article outlines the process and decisions involved in a collection care program that prioritizes items most likely to be used, while also minimizing costs, staff time, and required expertise.

Using Visual Materials to Teach Information Literacy Outside the Arts Curriculum
Peggy Keeran, Jennifer Bowers, Katherine Crowe, and Kristen Korfitzen

Abstract—Students in non-arts disciplines generally are not taught to read and interpret visual images in the same way that those in the arts are taught. As a result, students in non-arts disciplines are often uncertain how to incorporate visual primary resources into their research. Using several of the frames outlined in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education as an overarching structure, as well as the pedagogical model outlined in TeachArchives.org that focuses on active learning techniques, the authors outline their instructional techniques for teaching students to work with, and even interrogate, visual resources in a non-arts-based classroom. 

Curriculum, Departmental, and Faculty Mapping in the Visual Arts Department
Marty Miller

Abstract—The role of the subject liaison in academic libraries is evolving from reactive to proactive. Curriculum, departmental, and faculty profile mapping are tools that liaisons use to gain a better understanding of the needs of their academic departments. The Louisiana State University Research and Instruction Services department modified the University of Central Florida Libraries’ mapping charts as part of its own liaison training process. These mapping tools were useful as a starting point for text-based disciplines but were inadequate when applied to the College of Art and Design.  The author discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the tools, with particular attention paid to the faculty profile map’s limitations in charting studio arts faculty research and creative output. The Claremont College Mindomo mind-mapping tool is presented as one alternative for creating flexible, image-friendly maps that allow for a visual mapping of the visual arts disciplines. 

Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr., Letterpress, and Black American Print Culture
Courtney Becks

Abstract—Despite his international reputation and storied career, the work of letterpress printer Amos Paul Kennedy, Jr. has never received sustained scholarly analysis. This article parses Kennedy’s rhetoric, placing his choices and work in the context of the Black American print tradition that animates it. The self-identified “humble negro printer’s” life is indelibly influenced by the institutions of twentieth-century Black American racial uplift, including the Civil Rights movement and historically black colleges and universities.